About Me

I’m basically a geeky guy with nearly no natural athletic ability.  I didn’t participate in any sports in high school, and only did a little intermittent running through age 40.  A few months after my 40th birthday (in 2005), I decided to start running again.  To keep myself motivated, I ran my first 5k (Susan Komen Race for the Cure).  I liked the competitive aspect of the race, and it helped me to be more consistent with my running and training.

0478_40875In 2007 I signed up for my first triathlon.  Like many things in my life, it started with the thought… “well, how hard could it be?”.  About 6 weeks before the triathlon, I decided that I should probably buy a road bike rather than my full suspension mountain bike.  That went well, so 4 weeks prior to the race, I decided I should probably practice swimming.  I went down to the local lake to “blast out” a quick 500 yards.  Much to my surprise, I was sputtering and gasping for air after about 20 yards of swimming.  I quickly perfected my side stroke as a backup plan.  My first sprint triathlon actually went fairly well (once I side stroked my way through the swim) and I was hooked on the sport.  I started a Tri class that winter and at least learned the basics of swimming and training for triathlons.  I gradually went moved to longer events, with my first half marathon in 2008, first marathon in 2009, first 1/2 IM in 2010, and first full IM in 2011.  I survived being completely run over by a pickup in the summer of 2012, and invested heavily in rehab and training and completed another half and full Ironman races in 2013.  In 2015 I went through the training & testing, and became a USAT certified level I & USAC certified level 3 coach.

Besides training and participating in the events, I also enjoy learning about training philosophy/strategy, nutrition, and general wellness.  As the leader of a local business, I have used some of the concepts I have learned to implement a new wellness program, to help our employees live and enjoy healthier lifestyles.  I tweet regularly on training & wellness at @GGTriGeek.

I appreciate your interest in my site/blog.  I’d appreciate any constructive comments on the information I share… there is always something new for me to learn.

Thanks!

-gg

Twitter:  @GGTriGeek
Athlinks Profile:
www.Tri2Max.com

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4 thoughts on “About Me

  1. Greg we were talking about the Omega brakes at Elkhart and yesterday I replaced the Omega on my road bike with a standard Sram Red caliper to match the rest of the components. If you’re interested in putting one on your P3 I’d let it go for $50.00 if you’re interested. You can email me at valdlaw@yahoo.com. I checked the results today…nice job!
    -Roman

  2. Hey GG… Doing an Adventure Tri… My wife and daughter always try to find me at the finish line.. and never quite make it! Last year they were standing, clapping, looking for me at the finish and I was standing beside them!

    Is there a way to Track ME… so they have an idea of when they should look for me? I have a FitBit Flex and wonder if that would track me by GPS… My other thought is to throw my Iphone with Map my Run and share with her Iphone….???

    trainerjj@gmail.com

    • The simplest solution is as you mention… phone and tracking App. I drop my iPhone in a ziplock, and use an SPI belt to keep it from bouncing around. I use this frequently on training rides or long runs, with the Find My Friends App. I’ve also used My Athlete Live, where you rent a cellular GPS device, that provides tracking and speeds on a shared website. Overall this worked well at IM AZ for my family last year, and likely provides more up to date/accurate location services over a phone App. The new Garmin devices (i.e. Garmin Fenix 2 or 620) have a feature called live tracking, which connects to your phone and shows location, but also speed and HR data… but again requires your phone to be carried. I used this in a half marathon in April, and my family found it to be pretty accurate from a location standpoint (typically dedicated GPS devices are more accurate than standalone phones).

      FitBits do not have GPS built in, so there isn’t a way (that I’m aware of) to do tracking.

      Again, probably the easiest answer is to carry your phone… just make sure it’s protected and have your family assume you are a bit ahead of where it is showing you on the course. It’s an inexpensive alternative, and you can easily test it out on a training ride or run.

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